December 3, 2021 UMD Home FabLab AIMLab


photo credit: Mike Morgan for the University of Maryland

photo credit: Mike Morgan for the University of Maryland

 

Steven Lacey, Ph.D. Candidate in Materials Science and Engineering and current President of the Electrochemical Society (ECS) Student Chapter at the University of Maryland (UMD), has been awarded the 2018 ECS Battery Division Student Research Award sponsored by Mercedes-Benz Research & Development. He will be recognized formally at the 234th ECS Meeting in Cancun, Mexico in early October. The award carries with it a $1000 prize in addition to travel and registration expenses for the meeting. The Battery Division Student Research Award was established in 1979 to recognize young engineers and scientists in the field of electrochemical power sources.

Lacey will deliver his award presentation entitled, “Advanced Electrochemical Energy Storage Systems: Material Development, Alternative Electrode Processes & Planar Devices”, at the conference, which will discuss relevant electrochemical research efforts during his graduate studies. His thesis research is devoted to nanomaterial synthesis, understanding battery operation at the nanoscale (via in situ/operando techniques), and the development of alternative electrode manufacturing processes for alkali-metal-ion and metal-air batteries. Lacey has published papers spanning a wide range of topics including energy storage, catalysis, additive manufacturing, nanocellulose and wood-based processing, thermoelectrics, and plasmonics throughout his academic career.

When asked about the award, Lacey replied, “I am very honored to receive this prestigious award from ECS! Disseminating my entire PhD thesis research at an international meeting such as AiMES 2018 is a unique opportunity and one that I am looking forward to. I am excited to receive feedback and network with electrochemical experts at this Cancun venue.”

Lacey is a 2015 recipient of the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship. As an undergraduate at UMD, he received the Department of Materials Science and Engineering Student Research Award and won 1st place in the 2014 ASM International Undergraduate Design Competition for his team’s senior Capstone project on carbon nanotube body armor. 

Lacey is also one of the lead authors on a recent paper featured on the March 30 cover of Science focused on nanoparticle synthesis, which enables opportunities in materials discovery for a range of applications including catalysis (the acceleration of a chemical reaction by a catalyst), energy storage (batteries, supercapacitors), and bio/plasmonic imaging, among others.



June 1, 2018


«Previous Story  

 

 

Current Headlines

Postdoc Candidate Sought at Naval Research Laboratory

Engineering at Maryland magazine introduces new leader, new look

You Can Make It at Maryland

UMD Scientists Convert Methane without Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Wood That Can Cut Like Steel, Be Molded Like Plastic or Build Batteries?

UMD-Led Team Wins NSF Award for Rapid Materials Design

Expanded Wood Fiber for High-Performance Solid-State Paper Batteries

USMSM Debuts SMART Innovation Center

Incentive Awards Program, Engineering Lab Building Named for Mote

Improving Disaster Communication for Marginalized Communities

 

Colleges A. James Clark School of Engineering
The College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences

Communicate Join Email List
Contact Us
Follow us on TwitterTwitter logo

Links Privacy Policy
Sitemap
RSS

Copyright The University of Maryland University of Maryland
2004-2021