November 29, 2021 UMD Home FabLab AIMLab


Clockwise from top left, Bill Bentley, Greg Payne, Reza Ghodssi, Gary Rubloff.

Clockwise from top left, Bill Bentley, Greg Payne, Reza Ghodssi, Gary Rubloff.

 

Associate Professor Reza Ghodssi (ECE/ISR) and Maryland NanoCenter Director and Professor Gary Rubloff (MSE/ISR/ECE) are part of a new four-year, nearly $2 million National Science Foundation Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation-Cellular and Biomolecular Engineering (EFRI-CBE) grant. EFRI is NSF's newest and most competitive grant; only 12 were awarded in this cycle. The goal of Biofunctionalized Devices?On Chip Signaling and "Rewiring" Bacterial Cell-Cell Communication is to demonstrate signal translation by employing device-based electrical signals to guide the assembly of biosynthetic pathways, cell-based sensors, and cell-based actuators within a microelectromechnical system (MEMS); and to use on-board electrical, magnetic, mechanical, and optical systems to feedback and guide the cell-based system towards user-specified outcomes.

The principal investigator for the project is Professor William Bentley, chair of the University of Maryland's Fischell Department of Bioengineering. In addition to Ghodssi and Rubloff, the investigative team also includes Gregory Payne, director of the Center for Biosystems Research at the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute. Ghodssi is the principal investigator for the ECE/ISR portion of the grant.

The target of this project is the cell-cell communication system mediated by bacterial signaling autoinducers in a process known as quorum sensing. The PIs have created a computational model that captures the dynamics of quorum signal generation, receptor driven recognition, and uptake. This model, based on biochemical and biophysical processes, will help the conceptual design of subsystem synthons assembled architectures that guide heterologous protein synthesis in response to specific biomolecular cues. Cells will be signaled to initiate biofilm formation and maturation. The MEMS environment will enable for the first time, an experimental platform for the design, construction, and testing of this cell-based signal transduction process. Moreover, this MEMS environment will detect cell function and, by guiding signaling pathways, change cell phenotype in a controlled and directed manner.

The PIs will enlist guidance and support from industry, which may spawn new efforts in device fabrication, embedded sensor systems, bacterial pathogenicity, biofilm formation, genetic regulation and signal transduction. Developments are envisioned that impact fields of medicine (drug discovery, synthesis, and delivery), communications (biofunctionalized microfabricated devices), and security (smart sensors).

Related Articles:
Biofilm treatment device receives TEDCO MII funding; paper published in IEEE TBME
Lemonade from lemons: Despite COVID-19 sidelining of MEMS showcase, proceedings and papers quickly published
Symptoms all in your head—or in your gut? Maybe a little of both.
Rapidly evolving ‘smart marble’ sensors hold promise for monitoring pharmaceutical industry bioreactors and beyond
Ghodssi, Beyaz, Waits issued US patent for microgenerator
Lithium-ion battery research profiled in DOE newsletter
Micro-turbine research on cover of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering
Micro-turbo-generator research featured in Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems
Maryland Exchange with Italian University Boosts Research on Artificial Cells
New MEMS handbook is comprehensive, practical resource for academics, engineers, students

August 28, 2007


«Previous Story  

 

 

Current Headlines

Postdoc Candidate Sought at Naval Research Laboratory

UMD Scientists Convert Methane without Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Wood That Can Cut Like Steel, Be Molded Like Plastic or Build Batteries?

UMD-Led Team Wins NSF Award for Rapid Materials Design

Expanded Wood Fiber for High-Performance Solid-State Paper Batteries

USMSM Debuts SMART Innovation Center

Incentive Awards Program, Engineering Lab Building Named for Mote

Improving Disaster Communication for Marginalized Communities

Rosemary Parker Honored with President's Distinguished Service Award

College Park-born Quantum Firm IonQ Goes Public

 

Colleges A. James Clark School of Engineering
The College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences

Communicate Join Email List
Contact Us
Follow us on TwitterTwitter logo

Links Privacy Policy
Sitemap
RSS

Copyright The University of Maryland University of Maryland
2004-2021