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A crystalline tulip, sculpted by chemistry. (Image courtesy of Wim L. Noorduin.)

A crystalline tulip, sculpted by chemistry. (Image courtesy of Wim L. Noorduin.)

 

Harvard researchers grow garden of nanoscience delights

http://www.boston.com/news/science/blogs/science-in-mind/2013/05/16/harvard-researchers-grow-garden-nanoscience-delights/E3oYRwy8VMZlz3RDIENpfP/blog.html

"The garden is marvelously lush, with hundreds of blossoming roses, tulips, lilies, and curvaceous, fungi-like plants. But these petals, twisting stems, and finely wrought leaves are invisible to the naked eye: Grown in the lab, this nano-landscape is best seen with an electron microscope…..

"…Altering the acidity or alkalinity of a solution could cause crystal blossoms to grow outward into a bell shape, or to make them curl inward. Combining these kinds of techniques, they could create tendrils, the nested layers of petals in a rose, and the delicate cup of a tulip—which Noorduin felt especially obligated to grow, because he is Dutch. He was able to grow even more complex structures, such as a stem, a leaf, and a flower, all contained in a vase."



June 14, 2010


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Colleges A. James Clark School of Engineering
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