November 21, 2017 UMD Home FabLab AIMLab


 

A new molecular beam epitaxy system, which allows thin films of crystals to grow and interact, was lifted in several parts into the Jeong H. Kim Engineering building's Fab Lab today. The MBE system weighed several thousand pounds, and was carefully hoisted onto the second-floor loading dock for eventual placement in a clean room of the Fab Lab. The thin films that the MBE system produces can be used in transistors and computer chips.

closeup of MBSE system

 A closeup of a part of the MBE system as it is unwrapped from the shipping crate.

 

 

MBE system being lifted

Parts of the million-dollar-plus system are carefully lifted onto the second floor of the Kim Building.

Images by Jon Hummel, Maryland NanoCenter



February 11, 2016


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