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Radical photoinitiators used here for multiphoton absorption polymerization.

Radical photoinitiators used here for multiphoton absorption polymerization.

 

Chemistry Professor John Fourkas is leading a team of researchers at the University of Maryland in developing RAPID lithography, a method which enables visible light to attain lithographic resolution comparable to (and potentially even better than) that obtained with shorter wave length radiation.

"Our RAPID technique could offer substantial savings in cost and ease of production," Fourkas said. "Visible light is far less expensive to generate, propagate and manipulate than shorter wavelength forms of electromagnetic radiation, such as vacuum ultraviolet or X-rays. And using visible light would not require the use of the high vacuum conditions needed for current short wavelength technologies."

Professor Fourkas' research is featured in the current issue of Nature Chemistry. The full article can be found here.

February 1, 2011


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Colleges A. James Clark School of Engineering
The College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences

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